Mortgage Application – Apply Online

online mortgage application

Online Mortgage Application Form
Printable Mortgage Application Form

The online mortgage application can be filled out on your phone or tablet/computer and the printable one can be emailed to mcurry@mortgagewellness.ca, faxed back to 705-506-0501, or dropped off at 35 Worsley Street suite 201, in Barrie.

Please Note: If you are just “shopping around” for mortgage rates, or if you are currently working with another mortgage broker or financial institution, having multiple credit bureau checks done in a short period of time can actually harm your credit rating, as this is often an early indication of fraudulent activity. Credit Bureau checks will show when and who has been checking. Some lenders may refuse to deal with a borrower who has multiple recent credit checks on their credit report, or may require a valid reason why multiple credit checks were done.

Mortgage Applications will be processed by:

Michael Curry (705)717-5598
Mortgage Agent (Lic. M1200155)
VERICO The Mortgage Wellness Group
Head Office
35 Worsley Street, Suite 201
Barrie, ON
L4N 1L7

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

The Mortgage Application Process

From filling in the paperwork, to signing on the dotted line.

There are various steps that will have to happen before you will be approved for a mortgage loan for a home purchase:

  • Choosing a potential lender
  • A pre-approval process if you want to know how much money you’ll have to shop with
  • Meeting and information download
  • A Debt Service Ratios analysis
  • A property analysis if you have identified the home of your dreams
  • Completing the Application
  • Negotiation and commitment
  • Closing process liaison
  • Mortgage administration

Choosing a potential lender

Using a mortgage broker/agent

  • If you are using a mortgage broker/agent and when they know all they need to know about you and your needs, they will start to consider which mortgage might be a good fit for you. They will think about whether you meet various lenders’ qualification requirements.
  • The mortgage broker/agent will provide you with options based on an assessment of the lender, the mortgage, its structure, its features and its risks in light of the information you have provided about your circumstances. The mortgage broker/agent must also explain his or her rationale for the options that have been identified.
  • Make sure the mortgage broker/agent provides you with information that will help you determine whether you can afford the mortgage, including an estimate of the total cost of borrowing for the term of the mortgage. The total cost of the mortgage depends on the terms and conditions for paying it back, such as the interest rate and the amount of time it takes to pay off the entire mortgage or “amortization period”. The total cost can be much more than the amount you are borrowing. You need to determine if the rate, amortization period and total cost of the mortgage are right for you.

Going direct to a lender or through other channels

  • Make sure you shop around to find a mortgage at a rate and for a term that is affordable for you, and with conditions with which you can live. If you are using a private lender, lending their own money on the security, make sure that they are either licensed if doing business as a mortgage lender, or otherwise are using a licensed Mortgage Brokerage.

Want to be Pre-Approved?

It is a good idea to get pre-approved for a mortgage before you start your search for a new home as it might help you keep a budget range in mind. You can ask a mortgage broker/agent to help you with this process, or go straight to a financial institution or other lender.

You will receive written confirmation for a certain amount at a particular interest rate and the offer will be good for a specified amount of time. Keep in mind however that a pre-approved mortgage is not a guarantee of being approved for the mortgage loan, as that depends on a number of things including the property you want to purchase.

Meeting and Information

Your mortgage broker/agent or your lender will ask you for information to help them better understand you, your goals for the mortgage loan, and the type of mortgage you want or need including:

  • Your financial circumstances
  • Your assets
  • Your sources of income and/or funds, including employment
  • Your mortgage needs and objectives
  • Your knowledge of mortgages
  • Your preference in terms of amount, rate, term, amortization and conditions
  • Your risk tolerance
  • Other parties to the transaction
  • If you have identified a property you wish to purchase, information about the property that will become the security for the mortgage loan
  • If you know what your credit rating is
  • Your debt load or liabilities
  • The amount of down payment you have saved

They will also ask for documentation to confirm the information you provide.

Take the following information with you to your first meeting with a mortgage broker/agent or lender:

  • Information about your employment including confirmation of salary. A letter from your employer will be suitable for this
  • Information about any other sources of income you have and evidence
  • Details regarding where you bank
  • Proof of any assets including RRSPs or a savings account
  • Details of any loans or other debts such as student loans
  • Evidence of your down payment including information about the amount of down payment you have saved and where it’s coming from
  • The full address of the property
  • A copy of the real estate listing, if applicable
  • Your mortgage pre-approval certificate, if one was issued and you have now identified a property
  • Contact information for your lawyer or notary
  • A copy of the agreement of purchase and sale
  • Estimates of your monthly housing costs (e.g., property taxes, utilities, etc.)
  • Proof that you have the funds to cover any closing costs

Lenders or mortgage brokers/agents will rely on the information you provide. This information helps them find the mortgage option(s) and/or lender(s) that are right for you. It is critical that you are completely honest when providing them this information. Errors in your application can easily lead to a mortgage that is not right for you or fit for your circumstances, plus misstating facts or providing false information in your mortgage application can have serious consequences. You could face up to 10 years of jail time.

Lenders and mortgage brokers/agents are expected to ask questions and seek additional information in the event of inconsistencies with the information you provide.

Debt Service Ratios Analysis

Your mortgage broker/agent or lender will need to make sure that you can carry a mortgage. They will do this by performing a Debt Service Ratio Analysis, basically comparing your debt to your income to see whether you can afford the mortgage loan you want.

Most lenders will require that your monthly housing costs (Gross Debt Service), including mortgage payments, property taxes, condo fees and heating expenses, are no more than 32 per cent of your gross monthly income.

They also want to know that your total monthly debt load, including for example car loans or leases and credit card payments (Total Debt Service), is not more than 44 per cent of your gross monthly income.

As well as qualifying for the mortgage loan at the rate offered by the lender, if you are putting less than 20 per cent of the purchase price down and are therefore applying for a high-ratio mortgage, you will also need to qualify at the Bank of Canada’s five-year fixed posted mortgage rate, which is usually higher. In that case your lender will also require that housing costs are no more than 39 per cent of your monthly income.

This extra “stress test” is the Government of Canada’s response to the sharp increase in house prices in certain Canadian cities, and concerns that currently low mortgage rates will eventually rise. All home buyers applying for a high-ratio loan, and therefore requiring mortgage insurance, or those required by their lender to get mortgage insurance for other reasons, are subject to the “stress test”. It assures mortgage lenders that the home buyer would still be able to afford the mortgage if prices or rates increase.

Property Analysis

If you have already identified a property, your lender or mortgage broker/agent might need to analyze the property to ensure it is worth enough to provide security for the mortgage loan.

They might want to view the property online with you, view the property listing on MLS or a self-listing website and/or obtain a property appraisal or home inspection to determine fair market value. You may need to negotiate access to the property with the sellers, and you will be responsible for paying appraisal and home inspection fees, unless a lender pays as an incentive for you to sign up.

Completing the Application

If you are using a mortgage broker/agent to find you a loan, once they have your approval to approach a particular lender, they will complete your application including information about the property if you have chosen one, and information about you from your meeting. You should be asked to sign a written acknowledgement that they have disclosed the risks associated with the mortgage they have presented.

If you are dealing direct with a lender, you will complete the application with them.

The mortgage application will include basic information such as your name, address and telephone number, social insurance number, employer, income, number of dependents, and the name and address of your bank or other financial institution.

The application will also detail: your assets, such as mutual funds and RRSPs and liabilities, including credit cards, credit lines, loans or leases; the purpose of the loan; mortgage loan amount required; the type of mortgage loan you want; the mortgage term, amortization and interest rate you seek; plus a description of the property you want to purchase such as address, size, type and construction.

Make sure you read the application carefully before signing it, and never sign an incomplete form.

You will also need to sign a Credit Authorization Form giving the mortgage broker/agent or lender authorization to perform a credit check. A mortgage broker/agent cannot and should not request a credit report without prior consent from you.

Credit Bureau Check

A credit report from a credit bureau will tell a potential lender how well you have paid your debts and bills in the past, your outstanding debt levels, and employment, income and residence history.

The credit bureau report will include a credit score – a single indicator of how likely you are to repay your loan at the agreed upon terms. It summarizes all the information available about you and provides the findings as a single number.

The report will also include information about any bankruptcies, collections, judgments, garnishments or liens against you and whether you have gone through a foreclosure or Power of Sale proceeding in the last five to seven years.

Neither the lender nor your mortgage broker/agent will be able to give you a copy of this report, but can discuss issues with you and must note these issues in the mortgage application.

While the mortgage broker/agent or lender is required to do a credit check, you can always also get a copy of your own credit history and make sure it is complete and accurate. Doing this early in your home buying journey and before you meet with a mortgage broker/agent or lender gives you the chance to re-establish a good credit history if the report shows you currently have poor credit.

There are two main credit-reporting agencies: Equifax Canada Inc. and TransUnion of Canada. You will pay a small fee for this service.

Once completed you will sign the mortgage application form, confirming that the facts on the application are correct.

Negotiation and Commitment

Once a potential lender lets you or your mortgage broker/agent know that they are willing to advance the loan, you or your mortgage broker/agent will then start to negotiate the deal. You will discuss a final mortgage rate and term for the loan and you or your mortgage broker/agent might need to supply more documentation to support your application.

Once you receive the official Mortgage Approval or Letter of Commitment, make sure to review all of the terms and conditions before you sign and return the agreement.

Closing Process Liaison

Once the lender has received your signed agreement the closing process will start. Your mortgage broker/agent may continue to liaise between you and the lender and perhaps even the lawyers involved for you and the seller.

Ongoing Mortgage Administration

If you have used a mortgage broker/agent to help you find a mortgage loan, and their brokerage is also licensed as an administrator, after the property sale closes and the funds are provided by the lender, your mortgage file may be sent to the mortgage brokerage’s administration department. They will track payments, calculate outstanding loan balances and might collect municipal property taxes. They may alert the mortgage broker/agent when your mortgage term is near completion so that the mortgage broker/agent can assist you with renewal or the selection of a new lender for the next term.

Source:

Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO)

5160 Yonge Street, P.O. Box 85,
Toronto, Ontario M2N 6L9
Telephone: (416) 250-7250 | Toll free: 1 (800) 668-0128
Fax: (416) 590-7070 | TTY: 1 (800) 387-0584
Website: www.fsco.gov.on.ca

Mortgage Terminology Explained

Agreement of Purchase and Sale
A legal agreement that offers a certain price for a home. The offer may be firm (no conditions attached), or conditional (certain conditions must be fulfilled before the deal can be closed).

Amortization Period
The time over which all regular payments would pay off the mortgage. This is usually 25 years for a new mortgage, however can be greater, up to a maximum of 30 years.

Appraisal
The process of determining the value of property, usually for lending purposes. This value may or may not be the same as the purchase price of the home.

Appraisal Value
An estimate of the market value of the property.

Blended Payments
Payments consisting of both a principal and an interest component, paid on a regular basis (e.g. weekly, biweekly, monthly) during the term of the mortgage. The principal portion of payment increases, while the interest portion decreases over the term of the mortgage, but the total regular payment usually does not change.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
The National Housing Act (NHA) authorized Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) to operate a Mortgage Insurance Fund which protects NHA Approved Lenders from losses resulting from borrower default.

Certificate of Location or Survey
A document specifying the exact location of the building on the property and describing the type and size of the building including additions, if any.

Certificate of Search or Abstract of Title
A document setting out instruments registered against the title to the property, e.g. deed, mortgages, etc.

Closed Mortgage
A mortgage agreement that cannot be prepaid, renegotiated or refinanced before maturity, except according to its terms.

Closing Costs
Various expenses associated with purchasing a home. These costs can include, but are not limited to, legal/notary fees and disbursements, property land transfer taxes, as well as adjustments for prepaid property taxes or condominium common expenses, if any.

Closing Date
The date on which the sale of a property becomes final and the new owner usually takes possession.

CMHC or GEMICO Insurance Premium
Mortgage insurance insures the lender against loss in case of default by the borrower. Mortgage insurance is provided to the lender by CMHC or GEMICO and the premium is paid by the borrower.

Conditional Offer
An offer to purchase subject to conditions. These conditions may relate to financing, or the sale of an existing home. Usually a time limit in which the specified conditions must be satisfied is stipulated.

Conventional Mortgage
A mortgage that does not exceed 80% of the purchase price of the home. Mortgages that exceed this limit must be insured against default, and are referred to as high-ratio mortgages (see below).

Debt-Service Ratio
The percentage of the borrower’s gross income that will be used for monthly payments of principal, interest, taxes, heating costs and condominium fees.

Deed (Certificate of Ownership)
The document signed by the seller transferring ownership of the home to the purchaser. This document is then registered against the title to the property as evidence of the purchaser’s ownership of the property.

Deposit
A sum of money deposited in trust by the purchaser when making an offer to be held in trust by the vendor’s agent, broker, lawyer or notary until the closing of the transaction.

Equity
The interest of the owner in a property over and above all claims against the property. It is usually the difference between the market value of the property and any outstanding encumbrances.

Fire Insurance
Before a mortgage can be advanced, the purchaser must have arranged fire insurance. A certificate or binder from the insurance company may be required on closing.

Firm Offer
An offer to buy the property as outlined in the offer to purchase with no conditions attached.

Fixed-Rate Mortgage
A mortgage for which the rate of interest is fixed for a specific period of time (the term).

Foreclosure
A legal procedure whereby the lender eventually obtains ownership of the property after the borrower has defaulted on payments.

Gross Debt Service (GDS) Ratio
The percentage of gross income required to cover monthly payments associated with housing costs. Most lenders recommend that the GDS ratio be no more than 32% of your gross (before tax) monthly income.

Gross Household Income
Gross household income is the total salary, wages, commissions and other assured income, before deductions, by all household members who are co-applicants for the mortgage.

High Ratio Mortgage
If you don’t have 20% of the lesser of the purchase price or appraised value of the property, your mortgage must be insured against payment default by a Mortgage Insurer, such as CMHC.

Holdback
An amount of money required to be withheld by the lender during the construction or renovation of a house to ensure that construction is satisfactorily completed at every stage.

Home Equity
The difference between the price for which a home could be sold (market value) and the total debts registered against it.

Inspection
The examination of the house by a building inspector selected by the purchaser.

Interest Rate Differential Amount (IRD)
An IRD Amount is a prepayment charge that may apply if you pay off your mortgage principal prior to the maturity date or pay the mortgage principal down beyond the prepayment privilege amount. The IRD amount is equivalent to the difference between your annual interest rate and the posted interest rate on a mortgage that is closest to the remainder of the term less any rate discount you received, multiplied by the amount being prepaid, and multiplied by the time that is remaining on the term.

Interim Financing
Short-term financing to help a buyer bridge the gap between the closing date on the purchase of a new home and the closing date on the sale of the current home.

Maturity Date
Last day of the term of the mortgage agreement.

Mortgage Critical Illness Insurance
Mortgage Critical Illness Insurance is available as an enhancement to Mortgage Life Insurance. Mortgage Critical Illness Insurance is underwritten by the Canada Life Assurance Company. Complete details of benefits, exclusions and limitations are contained in the Certificate of Insurance. It is recommended for all mortgagors. It can pay off your mortgage — up to $300,000 — if you are diagnosed with life-threatening cancer, heart attack or stroke.

Mortgagee and Mortgagor
The lender is the mortgagee and the borrower is the mortgagor.

Mortgage Life Insurance
A form of reducing term insurance recommended for all mortgagors. If you die, have a terminal illness, or suffer an accident, the insurance can pay the balance owing on the mortgage. The intent is to protect survivors from the loss of their homes.

Mortgage Term
The number of years or months over which you pay a specified interest rate. Terms usually range from six months to 10 years.

Open Mortgage
A mortgage which can be prepaid at any time, without requiring the payment of additional fees.

Payment Frequency
The choice of making regular mortgage payments every week, every other week, twice a month or monthly.

P.I.T.
Principal, interest and taxes. Together, these make up the regular payment on a mortgage if you elect to include property taxes in your mortgage payments.

Porting
This allows you to move to another property without having to lose your existing interest rate. You can keep your existing mortgage balance, term and interest rate plus save money by avoiding early discharge penalties.

Prepayment Charge
Compensation when the borrower prepays all or part of a closed mortgage more quickly than is allowed as set out in the mortgage agreement.

Prepayment Option
The ability to prepay all or a portion of the principal balance. Prepayment charges may be incurred on the exercise of prepayment options.

Principal
The amount of money borrowed for a new mortgage.

Refinancing
Renegotiating your existing mortgage agreement. May include increasing the principal or paying out the mortgage in full.

Renewal
At the end of a mortgage term, the mortgage may “roll over” on new terms and conditions acceptable to both the lender and the borrower. This is known as renewing a mortgage. Otherwise, the lender is entitled to be repaid in full. In this case, the borrower may seek alternative financing.